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National Stress Awareness Day- Stress & Vision

WHAT ARE COMMON STRESS-RELATED EYE PROBLEMS?

  • Tunnel vision. You may lose some of your peripheral vision and feel like you can only see straight in front of you.
  • Sensitivity to light. You may feel like bright light hurts your eyes or makes it difficult for you to see.
  • Eye twitching. Maybe one, or both, of your eyes will randomly spasm.
  • Very dry or very wet eyes. While these are opposite symptoms, either one can be caused by stress. It all depends on how your body responds to a difficult situation.
  • Blurry vision. When caused by stress, blurry vision will probably be mild instead of severe.
  • Eye strain. Eye strain may be caused by something simple, like staring at your computer screen too long at work. However, it can also be caused by stress.
  • Eye floaters. Eye floaters are tiny spots that swim across your vision.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

If you think that your eye problems are stress-related, you can start by trying to relax. Think about your symptoms as warning signs—your body is obviously trying to respond to a threat, and it’s hurting you. The best thing to do is to try to calm down your brain’s response to danger.

You probably know what de-stresses you better than anybody. However, if you need some ideas, try:

  • Taking a long, warm bath and focusing on how it feels
  • Meditating
  • Taking slow, deep breaths, sending the air into your belly instead of your chest
  • Writing in a journal
  • Exercising

Once you’ve found a way to deal with your stress, your eyes should go back to normal. Stress-related eye issues should be temporary and easy to fix. However, if you continue to have problems, make sure to visit us at Roswell Vision Source.

In Health,

RVS